, For(bes) The Culture Newsletter: Remembering Tulsa’s Greenwood District 100 Years After The Tulsa Race Massacre | The Leaders Keeping Black Wall Street Alive, The Nzuchi News Forbes

For(bes) The Culture Newsletter: Remembering Tulsa’s Greenwood District 100 Years After The Tulsa Race Massacre | The Leaders Keeping Black Wall Street Alive

The following is an excerpt from this week’s For(bes) The Culture newsletter, dedicated to elevating and empowering Black and Brown professionals. Sign up for the newsletter here.

“Black Wall Street to me means radical and intentional partnership and collaboration across every segment of Tulsa and greater Black America,” says Randy Wiggins, founder of Build In Tulsa. “It’s about every part of the Black community in America thinking about Tulsa as what it was, which was the center a Black wealth creation, and everyone pulling an oar to make that a reality again.”

Wiggins is one of many leaders stepping up to preserve Black Wall Street and redefine what it means today, 100 years after the destruction of the original Black Wall Street in the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma. From putting down new roots in Tulsa to creating new initiatives in other cities, these leaders are determined to create opportunities for Black wealth to thrive.

We also can’t forget that the Tulsa race massacre, a result of white supremacy, was one of the worst episodes of racial violence in American history. The story, which has long gone untold, is one that deserves to be widely shared. DeNeen L. Brown is at the forefront of keeping the history alive. The award-winning Washington Post staff writer investigates the Tulsa tragedy in the PBS documentary Tulsa: The Fire and the Forgotten.

“For generations, I believe there’s been a desire for this story to be told,” Brown says. “Stories have power, and if they’re told, they can change the future, and they can provide some healing.”

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Spotlight On: Savant Moore

For(bes) The Culture member Savant Moore has had a life filled with second chances, and he’s paying it forward. A foster kid who graduated high school at 16, he joined the army to become a ranger, and graduated from Howard University at 31. After losing his home in a fire, he became homeless and was $200,000 in debt in 2017. He then learned how to code at 32 and became a software engineer, eventually paying off all his debt in four years. The full-time entrepreneur and author of Release The Debts now has a residential cleaning service in multiple states called Dade Clean. His next goal is to become the go-to for cleaning products. “No matter your past circumstances, you can create the future you always dreamed of with dedicated execution,” says Moore.

, For(bes) The Culture Newsletter: Remembering Tulsa’s Greenwood District 100 Years After The Tulsa Race Massacre | The Leaders Keeping Black Wall Street Alive, The Nzuchi News Forbes

News For The Culture:

Actor Kofi Siriboe’s new platform “We’re Not Kids Anymore” is all about building community around nostalgia.

Here’s how actress Kelly Rowland balances her mental health, advocacy and entrepreneurship.

Speaking of mental health, tennis star Naomi Osaka prioritized hers when she decided to walk away from the French Open.

Rapper, actor and business mogul Waka Flocka announced he’s partnered with Satoshi Art, a NFT marketplace owned by people from underrepresented communities.

Kristen Clarke is the first woman and the first Black woman to serve as the head of the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Justice Department.

Here’s what actress and Anser founder Tia Mowry-Hardrict and chief diversity officer of Rocket Cos. Trina Scott have in common when it comes to how they connect with consumers and exercise social responsibility.

“Black culture has empowered and emboldened so many tech companies, yet that value has not yet made its way back into our community.” – Hill Harper, actor, author, entrepreneur

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